Nefertiti

Nefertiti Inhaltsverzeichnis

Nofretete war die Hauptgemahlin des Königs Echnaton und lebte im Jahrhundert v. Chr. Bekannt wurde die Königin durch die Büste der Nofretete aus Kalkstein und Gips, die im Ägyptischen Museum im Nordkuppelsaal des Neuen Museums in Berlin. Nofretete (Aussprache: [nɔfʁəˈteːtə]) (in anderen Sprachen meist „Nefertiti“, ägyptisch magica-sardegna.be, ursprüngliche Aussprache etwa Nafteta) war die. Nefertiti bezeichnet: ein alternativer Name für die ägyptische Königin Nofretete und die Büste der Nofretete; ein Jazz-Album von Miles Davis; siehe Nefertiti. Nefertiti lived around BC - BC in Egypt, and was the wife of Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV). She became co-regent, gave birth to 6 daughters and died. Many translated example sentences containing "Nefertiti" – German-English dictionary and search engine for German translations.

Nefertiti

Nefertiti - Davis, Miles: magica-sardegna.be: Musik. Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen | Tyldesley, Joyce | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Finden Sie perfekte Stock-Fotos zum Thema Nefertiti sowie redaktionelle Newsbilder von Getty Images. Wählen Sie aus erstklassigen Inhalten zum Thema. Nefertiti Art from the time depicts a close family relationship, with Nefertiti, Akhenaten, and their six daughters depicted more naturalistically, individualistically, and informally than in other eras. For as much as this was a novel of sisters, it was a novel of rivals. This evidence might suggest that Nefertiti was the mother of Tutankhamen and a first cousin of Akhenaten; or that Nefertiti was his grandmother, and Tutankhamen's mother was Lotto Brandenburg Eurojackpot Kiya but one of Nefertiti's daughters. In John Henry Merryman ed. I've had a lifelong love affair with Funflirt Login Egypt, especially Lapalingo.De Armana period, and Nefertiti never seen it depicted quite like this. She may, of course, have died at that time; Nefertiti may have been assassinated and replaced as a Great Wife by another, perhaps one of her own daughters. The cultural Www Wish Com in it are for most parts the modern western culture. Nofretete hatte insgesamt sechs Töchter. Andere Quellen vermuten ihren Tod im Nefertiti Dies zeigt, dass sich Demoveranstaltungen je nach ihren Zielen aus mehreren Aktivitäten zusammensetzen Spiele Generator. Damit steht Nofretete stark in Beste Spielothek in Karnap finden Tradition ägyptischer Könige, die sich zu Regierungsbeginn noch häufig an ihren Vorgängern orientierten und erst im Laufe ihrer Herrschaft ein eigenes, individuelles Porträt entwickelten. Ismail u.

Nefertiti Video

Nefertiti's tomb hiding behind King Tut's?

Nefertiti wears her characteristic blue crown known as the "Nefertiti cap crown" with a golden diadem band looped around like horizontal ribbons and joining at the back, and an Uraeus cobra , which is now broken, over her brow.

She also wears a broad collar with a floral pattern. According to David Silverman , the bust reflects the classical Egyptian art style, deviating from the "eccentricities" of the Amarna art style, which was developed in Akhenaten's reign.

The exact function of the bust is unknown, though it is theorized that the bust may be a sculptor's modello to be used as a basis for other official portraits, kept in the artist's workshop.

Borchardt commissioned a chemical analysis of the coloured pigments of the head. The result of the examination was published in the book Portrait of Queen Nofretete in [25].

Dietrich Wildung proposed that the bust in Berlin was a model for official portraits and was used by the master sculptor for teaching his pupils how to carve the internal structure of the eye, and thus the left iris was not added.

The bust was first CT scanned in , with the scan producing cross sections of the bust every five millimetres 0. A CT scan confirmed Wildung's findings; Thutmose had added gypsum under the cheeks and eyes in an attempt to perfect his sculpture.

The CT scan in , led by Alexander Huppertz, director of the Imaging Science Institute in Berlin, revealed a wrinkled face of Nefertiti carved in the inner core of the bust.

The inner face has creases around her mouth and cheeks and a swelling on the nose. The creases and the bump on the nose are leveled by the outermost stucco layer.

According to Huppertz, this may reflect "aesthetic ideals of the era". The bust has become "one of the most admired, and most copied, images from ancient Egypt", and the star exhibit used to market Berlin's museums.

Nefertiti has become an icon of Berlin's culture. The bust has been in Germany since , [13] when it was shipped to Berlin and presented to James Simon , a wholesale merchant and the sponsor of the Amarna excavation.

In , the bust was revealed to the public in Borchardt's writings; in , it was displayed to the public as part of the Egyptian Museum of Berlin.

The bust was displayed in Berlin's Neues Museum on Museum Island until the museum was closed in ; with the onset of World War II , Berlin museums were emptied and artifacts moved to secure shelters for safekeeping.

It was moved to the Reichsbank in Frankfurt and shipped in August to the U. Central Collecting Point in Wiesbaden , where it was put on public display beginning in As early as , East Germany German Democratic Republic pressed for the return of the bust to Museum Island in East Berlin , where it had been displayed before the war.

Since the official unveiling of the bust in Berlin in , Egyptian authorities have demanded its return to Egypt. In , Egypt offered to exchange other artifacts for the bust, but Germany declined.

In the s, Egypt again tried to initiate negotiations, but there was no response from Germany. Hitler opposed the idea and told the Egyptian government that he would build a new Egyptian museum for Nefertiti.

Zahi Hawass believed that the bust belongs to Egypt and that it was taken out of Egypt illegally and should therefore be returned.

He maintained the stance that Egyptian authorities were misled over the acquisition of the bust in and demanded that Germany prove that it was exported legally.

Siehr, another argument in support of repatriation is that "Archeological finds have their 'home' in the country of origin and should be preserved in that country.

In , Hawass threatened to ban exhibitions of Egyptian artifacts in Germany if the bust was not lent to Egypt, but to no avail.

He also requested a worldwide boycott of loans to German museums to initiate what he called a "scientific war".

They distributed postcards depicting the bust with the words "Return to Sender" and wrote an open letter to German Culture Minister Bernd Neumann supporting the view that Egypt should be given the bust on loan.

Several German art experts have attempted to refute all the claims made by Hawass, pointing to the document discussing the pact between Borchardt and Egyptian authorities.

According to The Times , Germany may be concerned that lending the bust to Egypt would mean its permanent departure from Germany. In December , Friederike Seyfried, director of Berlin's Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection, presented to the Egyptians documents held by the museum regarding the discovery of the bust, which include a protocol signed by the German excavator and the Egyptian Antiquities Service.

In the documents, the bust was listed as a painted plaster bust of a princess, but in his diary, Borchardt clearly referred to it as the head of Nefertiti.

Stierlin claims that Borchardt may have created the bust to test ancient pigments and that when the bust was admired by Prince Johann Georg of Saxony , Borchardt pretended it was genuine to avoid offending the prince.

Stierlin argues that the missing left eye of the bust would have been a sign of disrespect in ancient Egypt, that no scientific records of the bust appear until 11 years after its supposed discovery and, while the paint pigments are ancient, the inner limestone core has never been dated.

Ercivan suggests Borchardt's wife was the model for the bust and both authors argue that it was not revealed to the public until because it was a fake.

Dietrich Wildung dismissed the claims as a publicity stunt since radiological tests, detailed computer tomography and material analysis have proved its authenticity.

The CT scan that discovered the "hidden face" of Nefertiti proved, according to Science News , that the bust was genuine. Egyptian authorities also dismissed Stierlin's theory.

Hawass said, "Stierlin is not a historian. He is delirious. Hawass also claimed that Thutmose had created the eye, but it was later destroyed.

The artists said the project, called Body of Nefertiti, was an attempt to pay homage to the bust. According to Wildung, it showed "the continued relevance of the ancient world to today's art.

In , the German press described the bust as their new monarch, personifying it as a queen. As the "'most precious The bust became an influence on popular culture, with Jack Pierce 's make-up work on Elsa Lanchester 's iconic hairstyle in the film Bride of Frankenstein being inspired by it.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Ancient sculpture from Egypt. The iconic bust of Nefertiti is part of the Egyptian Museum of Berlin collection.

Right profile and front. Left profile and back. Retrieved 18 November Discovery Channel. Archived from the original on 5 January Retrieved 23 November Van der Perre, 'Nefertiti's last documented reference for now' F.

Seyfried ed. National Geographic Society. Retrieved 16 November The Ancient Egyptians for Dummies. The Guardian.

Retrieved 21 November The New York Times. Retrieved 15 November Spiegel Online. Retrieved 17 November The Times.

Archived from the original on 1 March Retrieved 24 November The family most likely lived at the palace of Malkata in Thebes, which was grand by any standard.

Before the 10th year of his reign, Pharaoh Amenhotep IV took the unusual step of changing his name along with the religious practices of Egypt. Under his new name of Akhenaten, he established a new cult of Aten and abolished the current religious practices.

This undermined the wealth and power of the cult of Amun, consolidating power under Akhenaten. Pharaohs were divine in Egypt, no less than gods, and there are no records of public or private dissent against the changes Akhenaten instituted—during his lifetime.

But the modifications he made to the hide-bound religion of Egypt were vast and must have been deeply unsettling to the populace. He left Thebes, where pharaohs had been installed for millennia, and moved to a new site in Middle Egypt that he called Akhetaten, the "Horizon of Aten," and which archaeologists call Tell el Amarna.

He defunded and shut down temple institutions at Heliopolis and Memphis, and co-opted elites with bribes of wealth and power.

He established himself as a co-ruler of Egypt with the sun god Aten. In court artwork, Akhenaten had himself and his wife and family depicted in strange new ways, images with elongated faces and bodies and thin extremities, hands with long fingers curving upwards and extended bellies and hips.

Early archaeologists were convinced that these were true representations until they found his perfectly normal mummy. Perhaps he was presenting himself and his family as divine creatures, both male and female, both animal and human.

Akhenaten had an extensive harem, which included two of his daughters with Nefertiti, Meritaten and Ankhesenpaaten. Both had children by their father.

After 12 years of reigning as the beloved wife of the pharaoh, Nefertiti seems to disappear from recorded history. There are multiple theories about what may have happened.

She may, of course, have died at that time; she may have been assassinated and replaced as a Great Wife by another, perhaps one of her own daughters.

One tantalizing theory growing in support is that she might not have disappeared at all, but rather changed her name and become Akhenaten's co-king, Ankhkheperure mery-Waenre Neferneferuaten Akhetenhys.

In the 13th year of Akhenaten's rule, he lost two daughters to the plague and another to childbirth. His mother Tiy died the next year.

A devastating military loss deprived Egypt of its lands in Syria, and after that, Akhenaten became a fanatic for his new religion, sending his agents out into the world to remake all the Egyptian temples, chiseling out the names of the Theban gods on everything from the temple walls and obelisks to personal objects.

Some scholars believe Akhenaten may have forced his priests to destroy the ancient cult figures and slaughter the sacred beasts. A total eclipse occurred on May 13, BCE, and Egypt fell into darkness for more than five minutes.

The effect on the pharaoh, his family, and his kingdom is unknown but may have been seen as an omen. Akhenaten died in during the 17th year of his reign.

The scholars who suggest Nefertiti was Akhenaten's co-king also suggest the pharaoh that followed Akhenaten was Nefertiti, under the name of Ankhkheperure Smenkhkare.

Smenkhkare took two wives—Nefertiti's daughters Meritaten and Ankhesenpaaten—and abandoned the city of Akhetaten, bricking up the temples and houses of the city and moving back to Thebes.

All the old cities were revived, and the cult statues of Mut, Amun, Ptah, and Nefertum and other traditional gods were reinstalled, and artisans were sent out to repair the chisel marks.

She or he may also well have selected the next sovereign, Tutankhaten—a boy of just 7 or 8 who was too young to rule. His sister Ankhesenpaaten was tapped to watch over him.

Smenkhkare's rule was short, and Tutankhaten was left to complete the re-establishment of the old religion under the name of Tutankhamen.

He married Ankhesenpaaten and changed her name to Ankhesenamun: she, the last member of the 18th dynasty and Nefertiti's daughter, would outlive Tutankhamen and end up married to the first of the 19th dynasty kings, Ay.

Tutankhamen's mother is noted in records as a woman named Kiya, who was another wife of Akhenaten. Her hair was styled in the Nubian fashion, perhaps indicating her origin.

Nefertiti Video

The Mysterious Life and Death of Egypt’s Queen Nefertiti Finnland - 8 Deutschland - 4 Polen - 8 Spanien - 5. Belgien - 12 Niederlande - 7 Polen - 8 Spanien - 6. In dem umfassenden Bauprogramm, das Amenophis IV. The current website is using cookies in order to improve its efficiency. Echnaton Person als Paypal Konto Гјberweisen für Nefertiti Asteroiden. Die Familienszeneeine Art Altarbild der königlichen Familie, das sich Royal Games Kundendienst Ägyptischen Museum Berlin befindet, deutet vielleicht sogar darauf hin, dass die Regierungsgeschäfte in der Hand von Nofretete lagen, während Echnaton sich dagegen verstärkt um die religiösen und kultischen Belange kümmerte. In der älteren Phase, die vom 2. Die Odyssee der Nofretete. Bulgarien - 7 Beste Spielothek in Buchenbach finden - Kartenspiele FГјr Eine Person Niederlande - 5 Spanien - 5. Belgien - Nefertiti Frankreich - 7 Deutschland - 6 Vereinigtes Königreich - 6. JuliInhaltsangabe Januar erneut eine Briefmarke mit der Büste der Nofretete heraus. Das übergeordnete Ziel von NEFERTITI ist es, ein EU-weites, hochgradig vernetztes Netzwerk von Demonstrations- und Pilotbetrieben aufzubauen, das den. Das Projekt NEFERTITI (Project Networking European Farms to Enhance Cross Fertilisation and Innovation Uptake Through Demonstration) ist ein einzigartiges​. Nefertiti - Davis, Miles: magica-sardegna.be: Musik. Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen | Tyldesley, Joyce | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. History, and the Collection of Classical Antiquities. The famous bust of the Ancient Egyptian queen Nefertiti is the showpiece exhibit in the Neues Museum.

Cleopatra VII ruled ancient Egypt as co-regent first with her father, then with her two younger brothers and finally with her son for almost three decades.

She was part of a dynasty of Macedonian rulers founded by Ptolemy, who served as general under Alexander the Great during The amazing works of art and architecture known as the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World serve as a testament to the ingenuity, imagination and sheer hard work of which human beings are capable.

They are also, however, reminders of the human capacity for disagreement, For almost 30 centuries—from its unification around B. From the great pyramids of the Old Kingdom through the military conquests of the New The story of the Trojan War—the Bronze Age conflict between the kingdoms of Troy and Mycenaean Greece—straddles the history and mythology of ancient Greece and inspired the greatest writers of antiquity, from Homer, Herodotus and Sophocles to Virgil.

Since the 19th-century Built during a time when Egypt was one of the richest and most powerful civilizations in the world, the pyramids—especially the Great Pyramids of Giza—are some of the most magnificent man-made structures in history.

Their massive scale reflects the unique role that the pharaoh, Hercules known in Greek as Heracles or Herakles is one of the best-known heroes in Greek and Roman mythology.

His life was not easy—he endured many trials and completed many daunting tasks—but the reward for his suffering was a promise that he would live forever among the gods He is best known for his debaucheries, political murders, persecution of Christians and a passion for music that led to the probably Other Editions Friend Reviews.

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So is this like a historical book or historical realistic fiction? Konstantin Historical fiction, as in a novel, but great liberties were taken with history - and I really mean great.

The picture portrayed here is fluffy and hig …more Historical fiction, as in a novel, but great liberties were taken with history - and I really mean great.

The picture portrayed here is fluffy and highly subjective, but if that's what you might appreciate, go ahead for it!

See all 5 questions about Nefertiti…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4.

Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Nefertiti. Nefertiti, Michelle Moran When the Crown Prince of Egypt needs a wife, the beautiful, charismatic, ambitious and connected Nefertiti is his mother's first choice.

She quickly becomes accustomed to the opulence of her new life. As Queen of the world's first great empire at the height of its power, all her dreams are realised.

Beguiling and wilful, Nefertiti is soon as powerful as the Pharaoh himself. But when her husband breaks with a thousand years of tradition, defying the priests and the milita Nefertiti, Michelle Moran When the Crown Prince of Egypt needs a wife, the beautiful, charismatic, ambitious and connected Nefertiti is his mother's first choice.

But when her husband breaks with a thousand years of tradition, defying the priests and the military, it will take all Nefertiti's wiles to keep the nation from being torn apart.

Watching from the shadows, her sister, Mutny, detests the back-stabbing nature of palace life, and as she dreams of a simple life in the countryside, she records her sister's transformation from teenage girl to living goddess.

But Nefertiti's star quality can only take her so far, and when she's prepared to sacrifice her sister to strengthen her power, the two women become locked in a feud which only death can break View 2 comments.

Jun 25, Stephen rated it it was ok Shelves: audiobook , kings-and-queens , historical-fiction , romantical , ebooks , Anyway, I was very disappointed in this one, especially after seeing all kinds of rave poured on it from a gaggle of readers.

Now, in Ms. When I read historical fiction, I generally want a good story set amidst a nice history lesson of the period.

I was really looking forward to this book because I don't have a ton of knowledge on ancient Egypt more like a few pounds of knowledge at best.

I love really good stories that immerse you into a different historical period. I was hoping for something like that Alas, not to be found here.

I suppose if you go into the story looking for that, you may not be disappointed. The characters were pretty non-dimensioned and I never really cared about anyone.

So even as the dramatic events begin to unfold there was almost no tension in the read. View all 12 comments. Diana Gabaldon tagged this debut novel 'Compulsively readable!

I'm sure I won't be the first blogger to draw this comparison but this book was like The Other Boleyn Girl - Egyptian style - and for three main reasons: Firstly, thematically.

For as much as this was a novel of sisters, it was a novel of rivals. Moran demonstrated unflinchingly the horrible acts women are capable of commiting to gain power over one another through Nefertiti and her dealings with Kiya Diana Gabaldon tagged this debut novel 'Compulsively readable!

Moran demonstrated unflinchingly the horrible acts women are capable of commiting to gain power over one another through Nefertiti and her dealings with Kiya the Second Wife and her sister Mutny.

However Mutny is unable to abandon her sister, even as the throne of Egypt is crashing down around her. Through the relationship of the siblings, Moran shows that blood ties are stronger than the wounds we inflict on one another.

These women are bound to each other ultimately, not by their rivalry, but by their love. It was this central idea that for me echoed Mary and Anne Boelyn.

Secondly, this book has been written with a conviction that can be rare in historicals of famous figures. Apart from Philippa Gregory, I haven't read another author who writes such vivid characters based on real people.

After reading the author's notes, I was impressed at how much research Moran did so she could confidently draw her own conclusions on the character of Nefertiti and write a novel firmly grounded in historical fact.

While she concedes that some Egyptologists may disagree with her interpretations, she hasn't allowed this to deter from the characters she's created.

To me, this is brave storytelling. Thirdly, it is written in first person through the eyes of the overlooked sister.

As a reader, I think that was a smart move. Nefertiti, while fascinating, wasn't exactly likeable. Mutny however was completely relatable and I think had this been written through Nefertiti's eyes, readers would've had no one to have sympathy for.

Speaking of sympathy, as I often do when I'm finished a historical, I Googled the facts as soon as I was done. I must admit, I'm disappointed to know what came of Mutny after the pages of this book finished.

I really liked her and I had hoped the Throne of Horus wouldn't come for her! If, like me, Ancient Egypt has always called to you, then let it sweep you away into this book.

I don't think you'll be disappointed. A very strong debut novel. View all 5 comments. Jul 26, Anna rated it it was ok.

Remind me next time I'm looking for a new book NOT to buy one that is advertised on perezhilton. I should have known what I'd be getting myself into This was totally a summer beach read - although next time, I will wait for paperback too heavy!

I felt like it was just ALL dialogue ALL the time - the author never went into too much detail in her description of places, people, etc this reminds me of my high school English teachers constantly telling us to "show, not tell" in our writing Remind me next time I'm looking for a new book NOT to buy one that is advertised on perezhilton.

I felt like it was just ALL dialogue ALL the time - the author never went into too much detail in her description of places, people, etc this reminds me of my high school English teachers constantly telling us to "show, not tell" in our writing.

Overall, my opinion of it while reading it was "meh" - I was happy to pick it up when I had free time to read, but I wasn't drawn to it, by any means.

Also, the pharaoh was a total douchebag, to the point where his douchebaggery seemed way too over-the-top. Nefertiti was pretty obnoxious, as well, and in the same unrealistic, "overacted" way.

Now that I think about it, MOST of the characters were not likeable or even remotely three-dimensional to me. This just made the book feel schlocky and dumb.

View all 6 comments. This book was rather disappointing. The story of Nefertiti and Akhenaton, two of Ancient Egypt's most emblematic leaders was always one of my favorites.

Perhaps because of this, I had very high expectations for this book According to several summaries I've read about this book, "Nefertiti" tells the story of the Royal or First Wife of Pharaoh Akhenaton and it's also somewhat biographic.

I was always a little dubius about the "biographic nature" of the book, a This book was rather disappointing. I was always a little dubius about the "biographic nature" of the book, as I don't see how the author could have amassed so much information about Nefertiti.

It's impossible to write a fair biography of ancient people. Still, even prepared for a work of fiction and little else, I was disappointed.

Sometimes I even though I was reading about Medieval Europe. Another thing that annoyed me were the characters.

Moran portrays Akhenaton as a violent, insecure and ultimately dumb man. It is clear the author comdemns the Pharaoh's religious vision; her view on the matter shouldn't have been perceptible in a work of fiction such as this.

Nefertiti, too, is little more than a spoiled brat throughout most of the book. I have a hard time believing that any ruler could or would be allowed to behave in such a manner.

It is clear that the author lacks the compreension about the society of Ancient Egypt As such, this book is to be taken lightly; it's hardly an historical novel.

Shelves: historical , fiction. I am a great fan of well done historical fiction - Gabaldon, Gulland and Koen all come instantly to mind - but this certainly doesn't come close to any of them.

In fact, I never got beyond the first 50 or 60 pages. I've had a lifelong love affair with ancient Egypt, especially the Armana period, and I've never seen it depicted quite like this.

Amunhotep Ahknaten was depicted as a headstrong, foolish kid,bad enough, but where oh where did she come up with her idea of Nefertiti's character?

Va I am a great fan of well done historical fiction - Gabaldon, Gulland and Koen all come instantly to mind - but this certainly doesn't come close to any of them.

Vain, venal, power-hungry, obnoxious - would these 2 people actually usher in not only the first known monotheistic religion in the world.

I think not. So, well researched or not, the author gets no kudos from me. View all 10 comments. Jan 13, Maureen rated it really liked it.

This is the first book I have read by Michelle Moran. I knew very little about Queen Nefertiti before reading this book.

I have learned a wealth of information from it. Michelle has written a very interesting portrayal of Nefertiti.

It is told in the voice of Mutnodjmet, her sister. It is the story of sisters and family obligations. This tale begins when Tutmosis the crown prince is lying in his death bed and his brother Akhenaten is the only witness to his death.

There is much speculation and my This is the first book I have read by Michelle Moran. There is much speculation and mystery about this.

Nefertiti is 15 years of age and her sister is How will this all turn out? It is very will written and historically researched, even though little is known of this era.

Michelle Moran explains at the end which facts are true and which events she has stretched her imagination. I think anyone who likes historical fiction will like this book.

Shelves: historical-romance , epic , educational , cultural , dark-and-heavy , read-and-reviewed , historical , suspense , royalty , fantastic-book-covers.

You can only take the fastest course through it. Wishing it's an oasis won't make it so It was a great read. It takes the reader through Nefertiti's whole life.

I did not know much about before reading this book. It was particularly wonderful at setting the mood and taking us inside her world. I have read other books by this author and she is great at Historical Fiction.

But I particularly enjoyed this one. I have always had an interest in Cleopatra but knew very little about Nefertiti. I learned so much. For me, when reading any work of historical fiction, I need to feel like I'm there.

Atmosphere is as important as good writing. Michelle Moran does both. I breezed through this book and really enjoyed it.

There is alot of tragedy but that I did know going in. It is also told through the eyes of Nefertiti's sister which some readers did not like but which I thought was fine.

I would give this 4. This is a compelling work of Historical Fiction, written extremely well and I very much enjoyed it.

Dec 21, Asha rated it liked it. She may have been crowned This particular historical fiction book reminded me a lot of what occurred in the lives of sisters Anne and Mary Boleyn in Philippa Gregory's book, The Other Boleyn Girl , except with an Egyptian twist.

Three stars for me, but only because of the second half of the book. I knew nothing of Queen Nefertiti prior to reading this.

Her rise to power in Egypt is quite interesting. Along with her husband, Pharaoh Akhenaten, they created religious upheaval in Egypt by worshiping the god Aten.

It would be really interesting to read some non-fiction regarding her. The parts of the story dealing with Nefertiti's sister Mutnodjmet I really enjoyed.

This book leans a bit chick lit but I didn't mind too much Three stars for me, but only because of the second half of the book.

This book leans a bit chick lit but I didn't mind too much. Oct 07, Lizzy rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , read-years-ago , egypt , stars An enjoyable historical fiction about the ambitious Nefertiti, who married the heir and future pharaoh Akhenaton.

Much is obscure about that period of Egypt's history, so Michelle Moran 's creativity comes forth in Nefertiti as she pictures a time of political intrigue, the building of a new city, art flourishing to all end up with a spectacular downfall.

An interesting and absorbing historical fiction that provides a window into the sophisticated lifestyle back in B. Fairly weak novel with sketchy historical research.

What I found to be fascinating about this book is that compared to other periods in history i. Tudor England, very little is known about it. Michelle Moran has woven an interesting and credible tale.

What an amazing imagination she has! This story is told in first person by Mutny, Nefertiti's younger sister. As a character Nefertiti has been portrayed as a beautiful and passionate woman, who will go to any lengths to get what she wants.

There are many characters in this novel and I must confess What I found to be fascinating about this book is that compared to other periods in history i.

There are many characters in this novel and I must confess I had trouble keeping up with who was who at times. Mutny's character is amazing and she certainly suffers at the hands of her family.

While she is loyal to Nefertiti she also exhibits a strong will of her own that ultimately ensures her survival.

I studied Ancient Egypt in depth when I was younger and have read several novels set in this time period. Although none could compare with the details and complexity of the characters in this book.

I think Michelle did a wonderful job of bringing this time to life with an incredibly well researched story.

There is an afterword in the back of the book that tells you exactly what is understood to be fact and what liberties the author has taken.

To me this is always a sign of a great historical author. I like to know the fact from the fiction and often read this before I start the book. I gave this book 4 stars because I thought the first half of the novel dragged a little.

They apparently ruled together from to B. Artwork from the day depicts the couple and their daughters in an unusually naturalistic and individualistic style, more so than from earlier eras.

The king and his head queen seem to be inseparable in reliefs, often shown riding in chariots together and even kissing in public. It has been stated that the couple may have had a genuine romantic connection, a dynamic not generally seen in depictions of ancient pharaohs.

Nefertiti and the pharaoh took an active role in establishing the Aten cult, a religious mythology which defined Aten, the sun, as the most important god and the only one worthy of worship in Egypt's polytheistic canon.

Amenhotep IV changed his name to Akhenaten also seen as "Akenhaten" in some references to honor the deity. It is believed that the king and queen were priests and that it was only through them that ordinary citizens could obtain access to Aten.

Nefertiti changed her name to Neferneferuaten-Nefertiti, meaning "beautiful are the beauties of Aten, a beautiful woman has come," as a show of her absolutism for the new religion.

There were several open-air temples in the city, and at the center stood the palace. Nefertiti was perhaps one of the most powerful women ever to have ruled.

Her husband went to great lengths to display her as an equal. In several reliefs, she is shown wearing the crown of a pharaoh or smiting her enemies in battle.

But despite this great power, Nefertiti disappears from all depictions after 12 years. The reason for her disappearance is unknown.

Die Fragmente weisen folgende Inschrift auf:. Likes Echnaton und das Ende der Amarnazeit. August Auf: archaeology. Falls der Uschebti nicht schon Nefertiti vor Nofretetes Tod angefertigt wurde, deutet er auf eine fortwährende Regentschaft Echnatons zum Zeitpunkt ihres Todes hin, was gegen eine Vfb Vs Schalke Nofretetes oder Gleichsetzung mit Semenchkare spräche. So trägt sie in einigen Bayern Olympiakos Highlights weiterhin die dreiteilige Frauenperücke, die Hathorkrone mit Sonnenscheibe und Kuhhörnern, die nubische Perücke oder den für Königinnen typischen Doppeluräus. Lebensräume 15EUR Paysafecard Lebensbilder — Weltbilder. Dies ist ein starkes Indiz dafür, dass Nofretete unter dem Namen Semenchkare den Ballywulff bestiegen haben könnte.

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